Day: September 25, 2020

Massive damage of rare plants probed at Nevada mine site | National News

It estimates as many as 17,000 plants were lost — up to 40% of the entire population.

Patrick Donnelly, the center’s Nevada director, and Naomi Fraga, director of conservation at the California Botanic Garden in Claremont, discovered and photographed the damage Sept. 13. They believe the plants were removed with small shovels or spades.

“This appears to have been a premeditated, somewhat organized, large-scale operation aimed at wiping out one of the rarest plants on Earth, one that was already in the pipeline for protection,” Donnelly said.

He wasn’t aware at the time that researchers at the University of Nevada, Reno had observed the same phenomenon Sept. 8 and reported it to the Nevada Department of Conservation and Natural Resources’ Division of Natural Heritage.

Elizabeth Leger, a UNR biology professor leading a research effort to try to transplant the wildflower , is among those who suspect small animals caused the

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Droegemeier and Neumayr: Why Trump’s making ocean exploration a top priority

In January 1960, two fearless oceanographers eased themselves into a small steel sphere attached beneath a 50-foot submersible vessel and began an untethered descent to the bottom of the Pacific Ocean.

Almost five hours later, six-and-a-half miles down, under crushing pressure and surrounded by a pitch-black void, explorer Jacques Piccard and then U.S. Navy Lieutenant Don Walsh became the first people to reach the lowest known place on Earth, the Challenger Deep. For twenty minutes, the lights of their small craft, the Trieste, illuminated for humankind a place on our planet that had been dark for 150 million years.

Today, sixty years later, the United States is poised to lead a second era of bold innovation that will similarly reshape and expand human knowledge of the ocean, a priority for President Trump and

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Electronic alert reduces excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma relievers — ScienceDaily

An automatic, electronic alert on general practitioners’ (GPs) computer screens can help to prevent excessive prescribing of short-acting asthma reliever medication, according to research presented at the ‘virtual’ European Respiratory Society International Congress.

The alert pops up when GPs open the medical records for a patient who has been issued with three prescriptions for short-acting reliever inhalers, such as salbutamol, within a three-month period. It suggests the patient should have an asthma review to assess symptoms and improve asthma control. Short-acting beta2-agonists (SABAs), usually described as blue inhalers, afford short-term relief of asthma symptoms by expanding the airways, but do not deal with the underlying inflammatory cause.

“Excessive use of reliever inhalers such as salbutamol is an indicator of poorly controlled asthma and a risk factor for asthma attacks. It has also been implicated in asthma-related deaths. Yet, despite national and international asthma guidelines, excessive prescribing of short-acting beta2-agonists persists,”

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World’s Fastest Internet Speed Can Download Whole Netflix In 1 Second

The researchers in the UK achieved a data transmission rate of 178 terabits a second.

London:

Scientists in the UK claim they have achieved the world’s fastest internet data transmission rate, a speed which would make it possible to download the entire Netflix library in less than a second.

The researchers from University College London (UCL) in the UK achieved a data transmission rate of 178 terabits a second — five times faster than the previous record.

The record, described in a research paper published in the journal IEEE Photonics Technology Letters, is double the capacity of any system currently deployed in the world.

It was achieved by transmitting data through a much wider range of colours of light, or wavelengths, than is typically used in optical fibre, the researchers said.

They combined different amplifier technologies needed to boost the signal power over this wider bandwidth and maximised speed by

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Information Technology Services brings USC together for online learning

When COVID-19 threatened to disrupt USC’s family ties and sense of connection this semester, experts in USC Information Technology Services quickly stepped in.

They had to provide a virtual space online where Trojan students, faculty, staff and alumni could get together while they stayed physically apart. And they had to do it fast.

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“We moved up to fifth gear in March, and we haven’t really backed down from there,” said Veronica Garcia, associate chief information officer of application services. “Last semester was the disruptor, and it was about reacting and learning how to be online. This semester, we knew we had to provide more.”

Dozens of ITS developers, coders and technicians studied ways to use technology to bring Trojans together. They were joined by ITS communication and training experts to plan, promote and teach people how to use the new tech. The result: virtual learning for students this fall that

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